July, July. by Tim O’Brien (Read for Free, 151,559 Views)

As he did with In the Lake of the Woods, National Book Award winner Tim O’Brien strikes at the emotional nerve center of our lives with this ambitious, compassionate, and terrifically compelling new novel that tells the remarkable story of the generation molded and defined by the 1960s. At the thirtieth anniversary of Minnesota’s Darton Hall College class of 1969, ten old friends reassemble for a July weekend of dancing, drinking, flirting, reminiscing, and regretting. The three decades since their graduation have seen marriage and divorce, children and careers, dreams deferred and disappointe… show more ▼d-many memories and many ghosts. Together their individual stories create a portrait of a generation launched into adulthood at the moment when their country, too, lost its innocence. Imbued with his signature themes of passion, memory, and yearning, July, July is Tim O’Brien’s most fully realized work.From Publishers WeeklyAfter a comedic hiatus with 1998’s Tomcat in Love, O’Brien expands on themes he explored in some of his best-known earlier novels: memory, hope, love, war. It’s July 2000 and members of the Darton Hall College class of 1969 are gathered, one year behind schedule, for their 30th reunion. Focusing on sharply drawn characters and life’s pivotal moments rather than on a strong linear plot, O’Brien follows the ensemble cast (which includes a Vietnam vet, a draft dodger, a minister, a bigamous housewife and a manufacturer of mops) for whom “the world had whittled itself down to now or never,” as they drink, flirt and reminisce. Interspersed are tales of other Julys, when each character experienced something that changed him or her forever. Jump-cutting across decades, O’Brien reveals past loves and old betrayals that still haunt: Dorothy failed to follow Billy to Canada; Spook hammered out a “double marriage”; Ellie saw her lover drown; Paulette, in a moment of desperation, disgraced herself and ruined her career. Comedy and pathos define the reunion days, while the histories often devastate. Because they are such dramatic moments-a tryst that ends tragically, a near-death experience on the bank of a foreign river, the aftermath of a radical mastectomy-some of them feel contrived, almost hyperbolic. Still, this is a poignant and powerful page-turner, and a testament to a generation. Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. From Library JournalThe 30th reunion of Darton Hall College gives O’Brien the chance to play with a host of troubled characters. If you think you’ve seen this before, you’re right: it was excerpted in The New Yorker and Esquire. Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

July, July. by Tim O’Brien——Published in 2002


Back to Home >>

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.